Go Away With … Lauren Marks

In her memoir “A Stitch of Time: The Year a Brain Injury Changed My Language and Life” (Simon & Schuster, $26), Lauren Marks recounts her brain aneurysm and how aphasia affected her life. “At the time, I was an actor, director and Ph.D. student living in New York City,” she says. “I was 27 years old and had largely lost my abilities to speak, read and write. I was a foreigner in my native tongue.”

Go Away With … Lucy Walsh

As the daughter of Eagles rocker Joe Walsh, Lucy Walsh grew up with music. It didn’t surprise her famous family (her uncle via marriage is Ringo Starr) when she launched her own musical career. But, like her father, Lucy has also delved into acting. After roles in “Criminal Minds” and “NCIS,” she appears opposite Julia Roberts and Jennifer Aniston in the feature film, “Mother’s Day.” Her song, “On My Way,” is also featured in the soundtrack.

Go Away With … Caitriona Balfe

Actress Caitriona Balfe says she can relate to her time-traveling character, Claire Randall, in the Starz series “Outlander.” “I’ve lived in Los Angeles and New York for long periods of time,” she says. “And now I’m in Glasgow. It’s not like having different lives in each place, but each is unique. The country is a key character in the series. The Scottish Highlands are incredible. There seems to be magic and poetry everywhere.”

Go Away With … Jonathan and Drew Scott

“Property Brothers” star Jonathan Scott says, “I don’t think you can truly appreciate where you came from unless you have experienced how other cultures live. Travel has made me a more humble person with a better perspective on life.”

Go Away With … Rosanne Cash

What does singer Rosanne Cash bring in her carryon? “Really good moisturizer, good headphones, a warm scarf — even in summer — for airplanes, a bag of almonds in my handbag in case there is no time for a meal and my phone.”

Where to stay in … Scotland

My favorite hotel in Edinburgh is the Malmaison, which is located in the Leith district. Trendy but not precious, the hotel has all the comforts of home and the hipness of the latest club or bar. You’ll also find a United Nations of restaurants within blocks of the hotel. But be sure to make reservations. I tried getting a table for dinner on a Saturday night and had to really search for a place that could fit me without a multi-hour wait.

Rosslyn Chapel: “The Da Vinci Code”

When author Dan Brown visited Rosslyn Chapel four years ago, the small working church wasn’t on any tourist maps. Though located just seven miles south of Edinburgh, Rosslyn didn’t have the same cachet, as say, the more famous and majestic Edinburgh Castle. But thanks to Brown’s international bestseller, “The Da Vinci Code” — in which Rosslyn is prominently featured — the little chapel that no one expected to become a tourist attraction has become one of the country’s most coveted sites.

Go Away With … Paul Feig

Director and author Paul Feig may be the one American who vacations in suits. “My wife and I just love to travel,” says the 47-year-old Los Angeles resident. “We go to Europe quite a bit. I think most of the photos have me in suits. OK, maybe not most of them, but I do like to wear suits a lot. I guess I’m a throwback to the days when people dressed up to travel.” Best known for creating “Freaks and Geeks,” Feig also co-executive produced “The Office,” directed episodes of “Nurse Jackie” and acted in films such as “Knocked Up.”

Scotland

Scotland has become almost a caricature of itself in the American media with comics imitating Sean Connery’s brogue and Mike Myers “If it’s not Scottish, it’s crap!” skits on “Saturday Night Live.” Often viewed as less cosmopolitan than England but not pastoral enough to be as pretty as Switzerland, Scotland actually is all that and more. With some fabulous gourmet restaurants, the gorgeous countryside and some of the most amazing castles and ruins — all within a few hours drive — Scotland is a wonderful destination for travelers who want it all without having to learn another language.

Orkney Islands

Refer to any of the 19,000 inhabitants of the Orkney Islands as a Scot, and he or she will politely inform you they are not Scots. They’re Orcadians. They may live just a few miles north of mainland Scotland, but these island dwellers are an entity unto themselves. Yes, they eat haggis and talk with accents as thick as the blood used in black pudding. But unlike residents of cosmopolitan Edinburgh and nouveau-chic Glasgow, Orcadians don’t revel in trendy nightlife or upscale boutiques catering to the rich and bored.