Go Away With … Dhani Jones

Former NFL linebacker Dhani Jones traveled constantly playing for teams such as the New York Giants, Philadelphia Eagles and the Cincinnati Bengals. The author of “The Sportsman: Unexpected Lessons from an Around-the-World Sports Odyssey,” Jones’ latest project is the CNBC series “Adventure Capitalists.”

Go Away With … Akbar Gbajabiamil

Former NFL player Akbar Gbajabiamila is the co-host of NBC’s obstacle-course competition series, “American Ninja Warrior.” An avid traveler, Gbajabiamila says he prepares for overseas trips by researching “language for key phrases, history and what the locals enjoy. Of course, I have my top touristy stuff to do, but that’s at the bottom of the list.”

Go Away With … Dontari Poe

Kansas City Chiefs defensive lineman Dontari Poe loves football almost as much as he enjoys helping children. His Poe Man’s Dream Foundation started off with an annual free football camp for kids in his hometown of Memphis, Tenn. It has since grown into a program for children in Memphis and Kansas City, Mo., where they are given support with tech events and a three-month program called Dream Big Build Strong. “That program teaches them about healthy living and eating, and provides additional educational support,” says Poe.

Go Away With … Megan Alexander

“I grew up in Seattle, so Hawaii was a popular destination for my family and a decently close plane ride,” says “Thursday Night Football” sports reporter Megan Alexander. “Lahaina, Maui, has got to be one of the most beautiful islands on the planet. The beaches are beautiful, the Hawaiian people are so relaxed and friendly and the tropical drinks are delicious, because of the fresh fruit. There is just something magical about the plane touching down in Hawaii and the pilot saying, ‘Aloha and Mahalo.’”

Go Away With … Thomas Q. Jones

“When I played football in school, I took academics very seriously,” says former NFL running back Thomas Q. Jones, who’s now an actor. “If I didn’t get A’s and B’s, I couldn’t play sports. I was an honor roll student and graduated from university in three years. My parents didn’t push sports. They wanted us to do well in school.”

Go Away With … Benjamin Utecht

“I’m the nonfiction answer to ‘Glee’ and ‘High School Musical,’” says Benjamin Utecht. “I was the star athlete and homecoming king in high school. But I was also in choir and a thespian, and I really got a kick out of all that.” Utecht is currently on tour promoting his album “Christmas Hope.” Keep tabs on his latest concert dates at benjaminutecht.com.

Go Away With … Landon Donovan

Landon Donovan is the face of American soccer. An all-time leader in scoring and assists for the U.S. National Soccer team, which currently is competing in the CONCACAF Gold Cup, the 29 year old is also a star player for the Los Angeles Galaxy. Donovan, who is based out of Southern California, is a four-time winner of the U.S. Soccer Male Athlete of the Year.

Go Away With … Scott Fujita

Linebacker Scott Fujita is a team captain for the Cleveland Browns and has played football for the New Orleans Saints, the Kansas City Chiefs and the Dallas Cowboys. But his home base is in Carmel Valley, Calif. “Basically, we chose a vacation destination as our permanent residence,” he says. Fujita, who cites National Geographic Traveler as one of his favorite magazines, loves exploring and shares some of his favorite spots.

“Friday Night Lights” — Season 4

The fourth season of “Friday Night Lights” begins with Coach Taylor (Kyle Chandler) in what appears to be a lose-lose situation. Fired from Dillon High School as the Panthers’ football coach, Taylor is offered a position coaching the East Dillon Lions. No matter how the school board tries to spin it with platitudes about both schools being equal, East Dillon is rundown, has no funds, and has a football squad that’s a team in name only.

“The Express”

Based on the real-life story of college football hero Ernie Davis, “The Express” will remind some moviegoers of the heart-tugging “Brian’s Song.” Ernie Davis was a star athlete at Syracuse University and the first African American to win the Heisman Trophy. Unlike other winners of that era, he wasn’t allowed to attend his banquet dinner because the venue didn’t serve blacks.

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