“Doctor Crush” (닥터스)

“Doctor Crush” is full of bad characters full of bad intentions: the money-hungry father-son duo trying to take over the hospital; Ji-Hong’s uncle, who steals his inheritance and then dumps him off at an orphanage; Hye-Jung’s father, who abandons her; and even Hye-Jung’s raison d’etre for much of the series: revenge.

“Sungkyunkwan Scandal” (성균관 스캔들)

If you commit a crime against a system that is gender biased, is it really a crime? And, just as importantly, should you be punished?

“Descendants of the Sun” (태양의 후예)

Production on “Descendants of the Sun” began just three months after Song Joong-Ki finished his mandatory two-year military duty in Korea. He displays an easygoing flair in the role of the charismatic leader of the Alpha Team. Even bulked up (for him), Song is slight of build and baby faced. At times, I wondered whether someone like So Ji-Sub would’ve been better cast in the role. But, what he lacks in brawn, Song makes up with magnetism. He has one of those faces that the camera loves.

“She was Pretty” (그녀는 예뻤다)

If you were given the opportunity to be reunited with your childhood love, would you do it? Hye-Jin jumps at the chance, because she has nothing but good memories of Sung-Joon.

“Cheese in the Trap” (치즈 인 더 트랩)

There’s a word in Korean called jung/정 that’s difficult to verbalize. It encapsulates a feeling of love and loyalty that people have for one another. They will do things out of the kindness of their hearts, rather than as quid pro quo. I sometimes long for having more 정 with the people I know, but I also know that some are incapable of it. Jung is also the name of the male protagonist in this series, and I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the writers gave him that name.

“Moon that Embraces the Sun” (해를 품은 달)

A sweeping dramatic series set in Korea’s Joseon era, the “Moon That Embraces the Sun” is a love story that at times is painfully heartbreaking. But, it’s also filled with hope and humor. That combination makes for an addictive series that will leave viewers hungering for more.

“Secretly, Greatly” (은밀하게 위대하게)

“Secretly, Greatly” starts off as a comedy and veers off into a drama with a graphic, violent ending. Had the film stuck to one genre, the result would’ve been more cohesive and effective. Still, it’s a worthwhile film that will keep viewers on the edge of their seats. Kim Soo-Hyun shows impressive range in his dual portrayal of a North Korean spy and the dimwitted village idiot that’s his cover.

“Thieves” (도둑들)

A blockbuster hit in Korea, “Thieves” features an all-star cast that includes Jeon Ji Hyun and Lee Jung Jae. (The duo shared the big screen in the 2000 film “Il Mare” — the film that was later remade as “The Lake House” with Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock.)

“Producer” (프로듀사)

“Producer” is Kim Soo Hyun’s followup to the phenomenally popular series, “My Love From Another Star.” A light, romantic comedy, this K-Drama series touches on how ruthless Korea’s netizens can be over what they perceive to be an unforgivable lie.

“Dream High” (드림하이)

“Dream High” is one of those series that starts off with a ridiculous premise. But, if you stick with it, you’ll be amused, angered and (at times) deeply touched. Yes, this is a glossy high school musical with a love triangle. But it also deals with child abandonment, sexual assault and the abuse of children by the system set in place to manufacture “idols.” This isn’t just a Korea thing. Think about all the American boy band members who have revealed how they were abused by their predatory management.

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